Talking Teaching

May 23, 2014

some more thoughts on facebook & student engagement

Filed under: education, university — Tags: , , , , , , — alison @ 9:58 pm

After I wrote my last post, on using course-related Facebook pages to help enhance student engagement, I thought I’d see what students thought about the issue. So I shared a link to the post on the FB page run by our biology students, and asked what members had to say. I also mentioned the idea in class, and discussed it with a colleague (we were originally talking about student management systems, but it was one of those wide-ranging chats that grows and grows…).

Somewhat to my surprise – although I guess I hadn’t really given it a lot of thought – there are a lot of FB pages out there with links to various papers and programs. (Our registrar set one up with several friends, when they were working on a group project for a postgraduate paper, as a means of sharing ideas and working on problems.) The students tell me that they found the pages really did help with a sense of ‘belonging’, especially for those who were at a satellite campus or didn’t come onto the actual campus regularly. They gave opportunities to share information, answer questions,  & just be social.

Interestingly, several said that they found our ‘standard’ student learning management system, Moodle, difficult to use from a smart-phone: apparently you need to log on again and again; there’s no means of staying logged in for a day, for example. They also reminded me that with FB, you get notifications whenever someone posts something on a thread you’re following; on Moodle the notifications are less constant and via email.

And apparently some students find Moodle quite intimidating (& I must follow up on why), and people were more likely to comment & to answer each other on student-run class FB pages.

One thing that’s become more & more obvious to me, the more I think about it, is the immediacy and the highly visual nature of FB, as opposed to the text-based look of a Moodle page (and yes, I know you can add pictures!). Here’s a screenshot of part of the page for my A semester class:

Screenshot 2014-05-23 08.50.35

As you can see, it’s all words. If someone wants to see what’s being discussed, they have to open the ‘Discussion forum’ folder, & once they’re in there, they need to open a particular ‘topic’. They need to click on the link for a video or webpage – there’s no enticing link. And so on. Whereas on FB, the video or the page are right there with a nice visual tag. OK, posts and comments build up & will slip to the bottom of the page if they’re not active, but that happens within a Moodle forum as well.

Anyway, what I’m thinking I’ll do is set up a closed page for the B semester paper (students have ask to join) and send the link for the page to everyone in the class. I’ll make it clear that this is as well as and not instead of Moodle, which remains the official means of sharing information & resources. Also, I’ll set it up so the class reps – if they agree! – are admins (& they and I can agree on some basic house rules), so that there’s a feeling that this is more ‘by the students, for the students’. And then we’ll see what happens. (I’m sure I’ll think of more things as we go along!)

What do you think?

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1 Comment »

  1. […] day, in contrast to remaining logged in on FB, and that they preferred the FB notification system. This got me thinking about how best to use this as an additional way of supporting my students’… (This is not to say that they don’t use Moodle: a recent survey I carried out with our […]

    Pingback by reflections on e-teaching and e-learning | Talking Teaching — October 29, 2014 @ 5:38 pm


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